Thursday, August 30, 2007

A Golden Jubilee

Post moved to my other blog.

9 comments:

Feeling said...

I love my country, but did my country loves me?

daffodils said...
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jooshin said...

i like the way u put it. and almost represents what i totally feel. and the "controversial song" was pretty much harmless too when i first watched it. i love my country too, and it is very sad to see how it is has become.

Anonymous said...

Well said, Chang Yang.

youngyew said...
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Yong Chin said...

Tailou, 写得很棒, 很多生字:p。没错,在大马庆生的这一天,做为子民的我们,除了献上祝福之余,也得认真的,凭良心的,诚实地探讨当今的时局; 或说, 更成熟地分析现有的局面, 而非一味的奉逞及说些大家都喜欢听的话。不是要搞破坏或大扫大家庆祝的气氛,而是因为我们是真正的爱国,真心希望她能繁荣昌盛。国庆日吃Nasi Lemak才算爱国?国庆日在部落大事张贴国旗,自夸有多爱国?国庆日大唱国歌,穿与国旗同颜色的衣裳,想让全世界都知道自个有多patriotic? 这话对十几二十来岁的人来说, 未免太儿戏了, 您说对吧? 祝福我们的祖国, 愿她能茁壮成长, 撇开封建且落伍的思想, 迈向宏愿望!

jie ni said...

Persoalannya, 50 tahun Merdeka, apa yang telah dibuat? Apa yang akan dibuat? Apa yang tidak dibuat? Apa yang boleh kita buatkan ?

Apakah sebenarnya 50 tahun untuk Malaysia?

Kita masih dibelenggu, masih dijajah dari segi minda mahupun fizikal? Sebenarnya, kita belum Merdeka sepenuh-penuhnya.

Anonymous said...
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youngyew said...

Feeling, that's part of my sentiment when I wrote this post: "Of famous people and their quotations". Unrequited love is sometimes a hard thing...

By the way, I once thought that we should differentiate between "government / politics / policies" and "country". Yes people dislike the policies as enforced in our country, but does that mean they hate the country? Is the country the same as its government?

While there are subtle differences between those two entities, in reality it's quite hard to make any distinction when the feeling overwhelms you. It's like, if your family members have been abusing you, would you say "I love my parents but I just don't like their attitute"? Sounds like a contradiction to me.

Haha jooshin, I am surprised that you would finish reading this boring post, and commented some more... :) Anyway for the controversial song, I personally feel that it's harmful for certain people. Our country has a rather young and fragile population, most of us are not prepared for a direct onslaught of ideas and criticisms. So when a harsh voice like the negarakuku song reach people's ears, it might sound unimaginably rude and totally inadmissible.

However, even if they disagree with the singers' statements, our people could have done so much better in their response. Instead of replying diplomatically and intellectually to him, people who disagree with him chose to gag him, suggest to throw him to jail and threaten his family. That just shows how conservative our society is. We still rely on intimidation to muzzle others' mouth.

I have some qualms about the idea that it's totally wrong to talk about religion or race. In fact I would argue that the idea of "sanctity" over any issue is a mask of violence. By claiming something as "sensitive", some people justify their violent retaliation and brazenly mistaking barbarism for "pride and honour". That's ridiculous. I might as well say I believe I descended from a celestial teapot, label this belief as "sensitive", and righteously attack everyone who ridicules my idea. Does that make me right then?

By the way, if you are interested, Shou Farn made a really good case about the song and "sensitivity" in general here.

Yong Chin, I agreed with you. While it's good to be patriotic, we should be open-minded about constructive criticism instead of numbly celebrating the occasion for the sake of celebration. I am proud of the country's relatively peaceful 50 years, but at the same time I would love it to be better in the future too.

Jie Ni, saya bersetuju dengan anda. Sekiranya rakyat masih terjajah dalam fikiran, kemerdekaan terhilang maknanya.